Background

Plug-In Myth Busting

You may drive shorter distances than you think. The Department for Transport (DfT) National Travel Survey found in 2016 that the distance driven in an average trip was only 8.4 miles! EVs on the market have ranges over 100 miles each charge and they should cover most drivers’ needs for a number of trips. For longer journeys there are already over 5,000 chargepoints across the UK.

Over 10,000 (nearly 11K ) reported by ZapMap today – otherwise agree with the ZapMap panel later on.

Initial rumours about battery degradation seem to have been vastly overstated. Only now that large volumes of EVs have been on the road

for a number of years, racking up significant mileages, can the impact of batteries be realistically evaluated. Most EV manufacturers now offer battery warranties linked to a level of degradation so if the battery exceeds the limits within a given time or mileage the battery will be replaced for free. This confidence in the battery’s lifespan should give you peace of mind!

There are inherent risks when you store enough energy to drive a car, but these can be managed. We are used to driving around with a tank of highly flammable liquid in our vehicles and manufacturers are continually working to make this safer. A plug-in vehicle is no different and in fact, the amount of energy stored in batteries is far lower than in a tank of petrol.

When using a chargepoint the connectors at the end of the cable are locked in place both at the car’s inlet and the chargepoint’s outlet. Charge will also only flow if both connectors are locked in place making it impossible for adults or children to accidently access, this makes them much safer than conventional household plug sockets.

Plug-in vehicles, chargepoints and charging cables have many layers of protection built in against the weather. As such it is perfectly safe to drive or charge a plug-in vehicle in any weather conditions, sun, rain or snow.

Just as with petrol or diesel consumption, a plug-in car is affected by a wide range of factors, including driving mode, style and using heating or cooling. However, the effect of any one of these things is not so severe as to fundamentally change how the car is used.

This is a very common misconception, but as the UK continues to break
its records on green energy production, plug-in cars are now much cleaner than people think. A report by Imperial College found in 2017 that the average year-round emissions from electric vehicles have fallen by half in the last four years and they now produce around half the carbon emissions per km compared to a conventional car.Just as with petrol or diesel consumption, a plug-in car is affected by a wide range of factors, including driving mode, style and using heating or cooling. However, the effect of any one of these things is not so severe as to fundamentally change how the car is used.

With a properly installed home chargepoint there should be absolutely no impact on your ability to use electricity in your home as normal.

While your utility bill will increase, this should be more than offset by the savings on your fuel bill. Unlike an internal combustion engine where a person has no control over the cost of their fuel, utilities companies offer a broad range of tariffs. Utilising off-peak tariffs can make recharging even cheaper. Finding a combination of charging time, utility provider and model could lead to significant savings.

As with any vehicle, if you run out of fuel your vehicle will stop. However, with an ever-increasing chargepoint network, especially on motorways, you should never have to run out. There are also a wide variety of roadside assistance options for electric vehicles.